Have some pie!

Does Hong Kong remain a hotbed for international education?

Does Hong Kong remain a hotbed for international education?

While Hong Kong’s Joshua Wong may have captured the world’s imagination with his bold form of student activism, the heaving crowds, television cameras and pop star visits of late 2014 have since been relegated to archival news footage. But how did those events impact on Hong Kong’s student cohort and the international ambitions of its education sector? Tom Spurling reports.

Read more ⇒

How do you measure success in international education?

How do you measure success in international education?

Bigger, better data means that institutions can have a much greater understanding about conversion of enquiries and post-graduation outcomes, for example. But how do those in the sector choose to measure efficacy and success when delivering an international education experience? Beckie Smith finds out.

Read more ⇒

How does space planning enable better learning outcomes and economic gains?

How does space planning enable better learning outcomes and economic gains?

By nature student mobility is linked with sense of place. Students choose study destinations and institutions based on the expectations that they will learn the language and culture of the place. Perhaps what they don’t realise is how their physical learning spaces can directly affect how they learn. Sara Custer reports.

Read more ⇒

International internships: how is this sector evolving?

International internships: how is this sector evolving?

As study-work policies fluctuate in key study destinations, internships are becoming an effective and popular way for students to gain valuable on-the-job experience. To varying degrees, countries and private providers are developing strategies to enhance the role of internships within study abroad and as a stand-alone international experience. Katie Duncan reports.

Read more ⇒

Cultural collision: what is learning a language like from the inside?

Cultural collision: what is learning a language like from the inside?

Culture shock can strike international students the world over at any time, leaving them feeling isolated and displaced, and sometimes even causing them to return home. Katie Duncan finds out what agencies, educators and governments are doing to help smooth the transition and even speaks to students themselves about their cultural experiences.

Read more ⇒

Still looking? Find by category: