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Onshore recruitment: recycling international students

Onshore recruitment: recycling international students

International students are consumers considering an expensive and important venture overseas. But they can also become embroiled in ‘student flipping’, whereby they are persuaded to switch institutions after arrival, sometimes to save money or guarantee access to local jobs. Kerrie Kennedy explores an often unreported dimension of the onshore international student market.

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Stress-busting strategies for international students

Stress-busting strategies for international students

International students are vulnerable when they leave home and travel overseas to begin a new life and with the weight of expectation on their shoulders. A sharp focus on stress-busting strategies at institutions is helping them – and domestic students – attack anxiety and successfully settle, as Sophie Bauer reports.

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21st century Grand Tours: A luxury lift-off for study travel

21st century Grand Tours: A luxury lift-off for study travel

For clients with no real budget concerns, or those on a tight corporate timeframe, the rules around language learning programs are bending… Patrick Atack uncovers a new breed of premium programs, where concierge-style activities, lavish leaving balls, F1 experiences and deluxe accommodation are all part of the new normal.

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A two-way street: why China is not just a student departure lounge anymore

A two-way street: why China is not just a student departure lounge anymore

More than 489,000 international students were studying in China between in 2017, a 10% rise compared to 2016. According to Ministry of Education data, there has been a 299% increase since 2004. The appeal is manifold: cheap costs in one of the world’s economic powerhouses, scholarship opportunities and English medium programs, for example. Chris Parr finds out more.

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Experiencing culture, making friends and learning for the over-50s

Experiencing culture, making friends and learning for the over-50s

Learning a new language is not just for the young. Outside the customary reasons for pursuing a new language, such as university studies or a better job, there is also the relaxed-pace learner. Reem Nafie explores the 50+ age bracket and how educators are enticing this growing market segment.

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