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UK education and TNE exports increased to £21.4 billion in 2017

Revenue from UK education and transnational education activity exports increased to £21.4 billion in 2017, representing a 7.2% rise on 2016 figures, statistics from the UK government have revealed.

The strong global reputation of British education attracts overseas companies and international students to the UK. Photo: pxhere

Total education-related exports were estimated at £19.3bn in 2017, while TNE activity was £2.1bn

Total education-related exports were estimated at £19.3bn in 2017, while TNE activity was £2.1bn. This is a rise of 30.4% and 94.0% since 2010, respectively.

“These students bring a global perspective, enrich the community and are a vital pipeline”

The statistics also revealed that higher education accounted for the vast share of revenue, contributing £14.4bn in total in 2017.

However, revenue from further education for non-EU dropped by 67%, from £920m in 2010 to £310m in 2017.

Over the same time period, revenue from independent schools rose by 55% to £970m and education products and services by 36% to £2.1bn.

Julie Robinson, chief executive of the Independent Schools Council explained that independent schools are a “national asset”.

“They provide a broad educational offer including excellent academic standards and results that are world-renowned,” she said.

According to ISC, 60,000 non-British pupils at independent schools across the country account for £1.8bn of GDP per year, and support 39,310 jobs and generate £550m in annual tax revenues.

In addition, franchise schools run by UK-based ISC schools internationally help to fund bursaries for lower-income families in the UK, widening access to independent schools, Robinson added.

“The strong global reputation of British education attracts overseas companies and international students to the UK.

“These students bring a global perspective, enrich the community and are a vital pipeline to British universities,” she concluded.

English language training revenue fell by 30% from £2.2bn in 2010 to £1.6bn in 2017.

Head of transnational education at UUKi, Eduardo Ramos, told The PIE News that the increase in higher education TNE revenue reflects the growth in student numbers between 2010 and 2017.

But it also reflects “the trend towards a diversifying offer in markets and partnerships”, he added.

“UK institutions are developing new delivery models and partnerships as transnational education matures in traditional partner countries and expands in emerging destinations,” he explained.

“TNE has become an essential part of UK universities international portfolio”

“TNE has become an essential part of UK universities international portfolio, not only for its economic benefits but also for its capacity to widen access to high-quality education internationally.”

The revenue is calculated by multiplying HESA Aggregate Offshore record student numbers by the average revenue per student that resulted from 2012/13 BIS research, meaning these are “experimental statistics that need further refinement”, Ramos added.

“UUKi is working with the Department for Education and Department for International Trade to identify more accurately the overall value of TNE to the UK economy as stated in Action 19 of the International Education Strategy,” he said.

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