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US gov pilots pipeline for int’l high schoolers

The US government has begun piloting an intensive English and college preparation programme for foreign high school-aged students.

The academy will be open to students from around the world from next summer.

Syracuse University and the University of Colorado-Boulder are hosting the initial cohort of 27 students

The EducationUSA Academy, operated by the US Department of State, this month has welcomed international students to the US, from Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru in a bid to attract students at a younger age to the US’s education system.

“International exchange programmes prepare students for the globalised 21st century workforce”

Elaine Clayton, a spokesperson for the US Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, told The PIE News that the aim of the academy is to “create a new recruitment pipeline for international high school students who may not have considered undergraduate study in the United States”.

She added it also hopes to “raise awareness of the many outstanding institutions of higher education here”.

The high school students, aged between 15 and 17, pay between $4,000 and $6,000 to participate in a four-week long intensive English and college preparation programme.

In addition to the intensive English language classes, students will learn about studying at US colleges and receive guidance on preparing for the next step in their academic lives.

Syracuse University and the University of Colorado-Boulder are hosting the initial cohort of 27 students for the pilot programme.

“Over time, we expect that many accredited US colleges and universities will apply to become part of the EducationUSA Academy network,” said Clayton.

“And the programme will increase and diversify international enrolment at two and four year institutions across the country.”

In addition to the new institutions, from next summer, the academy will be open to students from around the world.

Clayton added that targeting students at a younger age could open them up to future international experiences.

“International exchange programmes prepare students for the globalised 21st century workforce and support strong economies around the world,” she said.

“Students with experience overseas at a young age gain important knowledge and skills, develop a global perspective, and become inspired to continue engaging in international issues and opportunities.”

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