The PIE News http://thepienews.com News and business analysis for Professionals in International Education Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:07:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 Vietnam’s licensing scheme all bark and no bite, say agencies http://thepienews.com/news/vietnams-licensing-scheme-all-bark-and-no-bite-say-agencies/ http://thepienews.com/news/vietnams-licensing-scheme-all-bark-and-no-bite-say-agencies/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 16:57:35 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55912 The latest list of agents under Vietnam's licensing scheme has been released, however stakeholders in the country have said that despite airs of an industry-wide clean up, the nascent student recruitment sector still has ground to cover.

The post Vietnam’s licensing scheme all bark and no bite, say agencies appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
The latest list of agents under Vietnam’s licensing scheme has been released, however stakeholders in the country have said that despite airs of an industry-wide clean up, the nascent student recruitment sector still has ground to cover.

After Ho Chi Minh city, Hanoi is the second largest hub for outbound students in Vietnam, a growing student source market. The Department of Education and Training in Hanoi has released a list of 200 agencies that have undergone the government’s licensing programme, which includes passing a test and putting $23,000 into an escrow account.

However, according to Kenneth Cooper, co-founder of Access American Education, which has had consultants licensed through the scheme, the list bears little weight when it comes to improving business standards.

“No one’s looking into how educational consultants conduct business or what consumers have to say about their services”

“It doesn’t mean anything because there’s no enforcement,” he told The PIE News. “There are still 3,300 agents operating erroneously. The government wants to shut them down but they can’t because they don’t have enough resources.”

According to a 2013 government mandate, agency owners and agents must have a university degree and be proficient in another foreign language. The certification process requires individuals to undergo a 40 hour training course which includes information on education systems of host countries and ethical standards.

Once they they pass an exam and make the escrow deposit, agents are issued licences by local departments of education and training, which are responsible for K-12 education and education agent in their cities.

Speaking with The PIE News, Mark Ashwill, managing director of Capstone Consultancy which has licensed agents at both its Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi locations, recognised the scheme is an effort to raise standards but said it is limited in scope.

“No one’s looking into how educational consultants conduct business or what consumers have to say about their services,” he observed, adding that the steep deposit could ultimately push legitimate consultancies out of the market.

“The financial requirement, which is to ensure that educational consultants have sufficient resources to settle legal claims, eliminates a number of companies that cannot yet afford that amount,” he said.

“The fact that a company can afford to put $23,000 on deposit for each office doesn’t mean it’s a quality company, it just means it’s doing well financially or has other resources at its disposal.”

Despite the programme’s limitations, Ashwill commended the government’s efforts.

“At least there are some hoops to jump through,” he said. “Until this new policy, proposed by MoET [ministry of education and training] and issued by the Prime Minister over two years ago, the government didn’t require educational consulting companies to have any sort of certification.”

“It’s ultimately the responsibility of institutions to know what’s being said and done in their name”

Vietnam is increasingly becoming a fruitful market for student recruiters keen to diversify campus nationalities. The country has seen demand boom in the past decade, mostly for studies in the US.

It was also among the top four emerging markets to watch listed in a recent report by World Education Services that urged educators to look beyond China, India and South Korea.

But, despite rapid growth, especially in secondary school enrolments, Cooper at AAE says Vietnam is still very much a “frontier market” with sub-standard practices.

Ashwill, meanwhile, argued that for the time being, in Vietnam, educators should be charged with finding reliable agents on their own.

“It’s ultimately the responsibility of institutions that work with agents to screen them properly, stay in touch with them and cultivate the relationship so they know what’s going on, and what’s being said and done in their name,” he said.

The post Vietnam’s licensing scheme all bark and no bite, say agencies appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/vietnams-licensing-scheme-all-bark-and-no-bite-say-agencies/feed/ 0
Exchange project doubles EU students in Korea http://thepienews.com/news/exchange-project-doubles-eu-students-in-korea/ http://thepienews.com/news/exchange-project-doubles-eu-students-in-korea/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 13:00:53 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55899 An international student exchange programme between institutions in Korea and the EU has doubled the number of students it has sent to study in Korea in the last 12 months.

The post Exchange project doubles EU students in Korea appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
An international student exchange programme between institutions in Korea and the EU has doubled the number of students it has sent to study in Korea in the last 12 months.

Forty students from EU countries studied in Korea in 2014/15 through the Korea and EU Degree Opportunities for Students programme. The 100% increase in outbound students flouts the stereotype of some European students lacking interest in study abroad, participants say.

“Historically, the reputation of UK universities has been that students are not interested in studying abroad – but this project has shown that for us, it’s completely the opposite”

Set up in 2012 to facilitate a ‘25%’ dual degree framework – where one year out of a four year degree is spent abroad – the programme is backed by 1.1bn won (€790,000) in funding from EU and the National Research Foundation of Korea.

Seven universities are participating in the project including Warsaw University of Technology and the University of Warsaw in Poland and the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia, which is organised by Kyungpook National University in Korea and led by Budapest University of Technology and Economics in Hungary.

Focussed on graduate employability, the programme enables students to work and study simultaneously.

“Choosing to go to Korea says something very different about you,” commented Alison Pearce, project manager at Northumbria University.

“For students who have taken part, subsequent interviews always tend to be dominated by questions about their experience of Korea.”

Northumbria is a partner in the project, enabling students to spend a full year at either KNU in Daegu or Chonnam National University in Gwangju in order to obtain degrees from both institutions they attend.

“Historically, the reputation of UK universities has been that students are not interested in studying abroad – but this project has shown that for us, it’s completely the opposite,” said Pearce.

“It’s not just about students going over there to study; they have to adjust to a very challenging – and at times – alien environment and culture.”

At the beginning of the project, it was predicted that 180 Korean and EU students will benefit from the initiative, which will run until 2016.

An additional 13 Korean and 20 EU faculty members will spend time overseas over the course of the project.

The post Exchange project doubles EU students in Korea appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/exchange-project-doubles-eu-students-in-korea/feed/ 0
WES urges US institutions to focus recruitment on emerging markets http://thepienews.com/news/wes-urges-us-institutions-to-focus-recruitment-on-emerging-markets/ http://thepienews.com/news/wes-urges-us-institutions-to-focus-recruitment-on-emerging-markets/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:35:23 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55887 US institutions hoping to increase their international student recruitment should look to Brazil, Vietnam, Indonesia and Nigeria as the top for emerging markets to watch over the next three years.

The post WES urges US institutions to focus recruitment on emerging markets appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
US institutions hoping to increase their international student recruitment should look to Brazil, Vietnam, Indonesia and Nigeria as the top four emerging markets to watch over the next three years.

This is the finding of a study by World Education Services, which urges US institutions to look beyond the major markets of China, India and South Korea for international recruitment.

“One of the key motivations for this study was to help institutions derisk the dependency on few markets like China”

The study combined quantative and qualitative survey data to identify markets expected to see strong growth in students headed in the US in the coming years.

“One of the key motivations for this study was to help institutions derisk the dependency on few markets like China,” Rahul Choudaha, chief knowledge officer at WES, told The PIE News. “This overdependency is not only risky for maintaining enrolment projections but also deterimental to student experiences and institutional reputation.”

It builds on a 2012 WES report on emerging markets, delving into contextual changes like economic and educational development which impact demand for education abroad to look at how institutions should approach recruitment in these countries.

All four countries saw a substantial increase in the number of students they sent to the US between 2009/10 and 2013/14, the report shows, according to IIE Open Doors figures.

For Brazil, the increase was as high as 51%, while Vietnam, Nigeria and Indonesia saw respective increases of 26%, 21% and 14%.

Of the 13,285 Brazilian students enrolled in the US in 2014, most were tertiary students, with 38.3% at undergraduate and 23.5% at graduate level.

The increase in demand from Brazil is driven by the the success of the Scientific Mobility Program, according to the report. Just over a fifth of Brazilian students in the US study STEM subjects.

Daniel Obst, deputy vice president, international partnerships at the Institute of International Education, which helps to manage the programme, confirmed he has seen growing interest among US institutions to work with Brazil through the government-backed programme.

He added that this has had a knock-on effect to “trigger significant interest” among US insitutions in forging further research and exchange parnerships with Brazilian counterparts.

Along with Brazil, Vietnam was also identified as an emerging market by WES in 2012.

With 15,579 students in the US in 2013/14, Vietnam is the country’s eighth largest source market.

It has seen significant growth in outbound numbers over the last 13 years and “looks set to continue as a strong growth market” thanks to an expanding economy, the report states.

The report notes rapid growth in student numbers coming from these four emerging markets.

The report notes rapid growth in student numbers coming from these four emerging markets.

This will also enable a growing middle class to send their children abroad at a younger age, it predicts.

Meanwhile, an increasing pool of Vietnamese secondary-school graduates in the US “represents an emerging and significant recruitment channel for HEIs”.

Despite the economic growth, students from Vietnam “often lack financial resources” despite being academically well-prepared, the report states.

More than half of tertiary-level students are enrolled at community colleges, which are cheaper than universities.

It does advise that: “Institutions that wish to enrol more Vietnamese undergraduate students should consider promoting scholarship and financial aid opportunities.”

Nigeria and Indonesia, both with around 7,900 students in 2013/14, are smaller markets, but booming economies present significant opportunities for recruitment, according to the report.

In Indonesia – “one of the world’s most significant emerging economies” – enrolments are bouncing back after nearly a decade of decline to 2010/11.

Two thirds are at undergraduate level and STEM subjects are the most popular areas of study, taken by a third of Indonesian students.

“If institutions are serious about expanding into emerging markets and recruiting students from there, they need to invest in scholarships”

An effective social media strategy is “key” for institutions keen to recruit from this country, the report says, with Facebook users expected to reach almost 100 million by 2018.

STEM subjects were also popular in Nigeria, accounting for over half of all incoming students.

Almost half of enrolments are for undergraduate programmes, and connecting with international schools can be a fruitful recruitment channel in Nigeria, the report notes.

Alumni engagement and scholarships can also help to boost intake from Nigeria, it states.

Obst at IIE agreed that: “If institutions are serious about expanding into emerging markets and recruiting students from there, they need to invest both in sustainable academic partnerships but also in scholarships for students.”

EducationUSA, a branch of the US State Department, is also actively supporting US institutions in emerging markets.

“We offer a comprehensive mix of virtual and in-person opportunities for the US higher education community to engage with EducationUSA advisers, as well as directly with millions of prospective international students,” Jarred Butto, acting chief of EducationUSA, told The PIE News.

Last year EducationUSA ran 30 study fairs worldwide. Its Southeast Asia fair connected US institutions with thousands of prospective students from across the region, including Indonesia and Vietnam.

The post WES urges US institutions to focus recruitment on emerging markets appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/wes-urges-us-institutions-to-focus-recruitment-on-emerging-markets/feed/ 0
Mexico, Colombia to exchange becas students http://thepienews.com/news/mexico-colombia-to-exchange-becas-students/ http://thepienews.com/news/mexico-colombia-to-exchange-becas-students/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 13:38:03 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55878 Two leading private universities in Latin America have announced an exchange programme for low-income students who qualify for their merit-based scholarship programmes.

The post Mexico, Colombia to exchange becas students appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
Two leading private universities in Latin America have announced an exchange initiative for low-income students who qualify for their merit-based scholarship (becas) programmes.

Leaders of the Tecnológico de Monterrey (TEC) in Mexico and the Universidad de los Andes (UNIANDES) in Colombia this month said the exchange is the beginning of a community of future leaders in the region.

From next year, 25 students from UNIANDES’s Quiero Estudiar and TEC’s Líderes del Mañana scholarship programmes will participate in the exchange.

Salvador Alva, President of TEC, announced the partnership at the opening of the second annual Líderes del Mañana welcome event this month.

“With a global vision, today we’re eliminating physical borders and launching the community of Latin American leaders, TEC-UNIANDES.”

“We want you to go and be nourished by what they’ve done to clean up social inequality, disobedience and insecurity”

“We’re looking for the 25 students who have the ability to gain a lot from this type of exchange. In Colombia they have done many things to transform society and we want you to go and be nourished by what they’ve done to clean up social inequality, disobedience and insecurity,”  TEC rector David Noel Ramírez told students.

UNIANDES rector Pablo Navas echoed his optimism, highlighting the students’ ability to make changes in the region.

“We sleep sounder because of the example you’ve given until now showing that you’re clearly capable and the future of our countries will be much better,” he said.

The Líderes del Mañana programme, established last year, was inspired by UNIANDES’s programme, Quiero Estudiar, which launched in 2009.

UNIANDES’ Quiero Estudiar programme has supported almost 400 students through to graduation since its inception.

The programme covers complete tuition costs for students from low-income backgrounds with the requirement that they return the money once they have stable employments in order to sustain the programe and extend the opportunity to future students.

Similarly, Líderes del Mañana targets students with little to no economic resources to pay for higher education. The programme, funded mostly by TEC, covers 100% of course fees and living costs for up to 200 students a year without any responsibility of repayment.

The post Mexico, Colombia to exchange becas students appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/mexico-colombia-to-exchange-becas-students/feed/ 0
US: PSW rights for STEM graduates to be curtailed http://thepienews.com/news/us-psw-rights-for-stem-graduates-to-be-curtailed/ http://thepienews.com/news/us-psw-rights-for-stem-graduates-to-be-curtailed/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 17:01:38 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55872 The Optional Practical Training programme enabling international STEM graduates of US higher education institutions to stay and work in the county for 29 months is to be curtailed, a judge ruled last week, though the decision has been stayed for six months.

The post US: PSW rights for STEM graduates to be curtailed appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
The Optional Practical Training programme enabling international STEM graduates of US higher education institutions to stay and work in the county for 29 months is to be curtailed, a judge ruled last week, though the decision has been stayed for six months.

Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle ruled that an extension of the OPT in 2008, adding a 17-month extension for eligible STEM graduates to the existing 12 months’ post study work allowance, was issued without appropriate public notice or comment.

 “The court will order that the 2008 Rule — and its subsequent amendments — be vacated, but it will order that the vacatur be stayed”

The 2008 regulations also meant that students studying on an F-1 (student) visa could stay in the country for 60 days post-graduation to apply for OPT, which has also been curtailed under the ruling.

However, the decision will not come into effect until February 2016. Segal Huvelle said that abolishing the rule immediately would cause “thousands of foreign students with work authorisations to scramble”.

“The court sees no way of immediately restoring the pre-2008 status quo without causing substantial hardship for foreign students and a major labour disruption for the technology sector,” she said.

“As such, the court will order that the 2008 Rule — and its subsequent amendments — be vacated, but it will order that the vacatur be stayed.”

The DHS now has until February to submit the rules of the programme for public comment.

Some educators are concerned that the ruling may make the US less competitive as a global study destination. Heather Stewart, counsel and director of immigration policy at NAFSA, called the court decision “just another consequence of the unpredictable and broken US immigration system, which is already a deterrent to prospective international students”.

“The experiential learning opportunity that is optional practical training is highly valued by international students and plays an important role in providing a full educational experience,” she told The PIE News.

The case was brought by the Washington Alliance of Technology Workers, which sued the DHS, claiming that the regulation poses a threat to American jobs.

“The experiential learning opportunity that is optional practical training is highly valued by international students and plays an important role in providing a full educational experience”

“American workers and the public at large were given no notice that the regulations were even being considered until DHS dropped them fait accompli without notice and comment,” said John Miano, the attorney representing the union.

The extension was originally brought in along with a raft of measures to make the US a more appealing study destination for STEM subjects in 2008, amid concerns that a shortage of STEM graduates might put the national economy at risk.

“The Bush administration hastily implemented this extension in an attempt to address the H-1B [skilled worker visa] shortage and lack of green cards, after failed congressional attempts to pass immigration reform,” explained Stewart at NAFSA, saying that this has put pressure on OPT to act as a temporary status until students can find another legal path to stay in the US.

NAFSA is “hopeful that DHS will be able to complete the rulemaking process” to enable foreign students on STEM OPT to stay in the country, she said, but added that the power to implement reform ultimately lies with Congress.

“It is long past time for the US Congress to pass immigration reform to fix our broken pipeline of talent and meet the educational, economic, and security needs of our nation,” she said.

“Having the opportunity to stay for a substantial period of optional practical training certainly adds to America’s competitive advantage in attracting such students, and also benefits the companies and labs which host them,” added Peggy Blumenthal, senior counselor to the president at the Institute of International Education, told The PIE News.

The post US: PSW rights for STEM graduates to be curtailed appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/us-psw-rights-for-stem-graduates-to-be-curtailed/feed/ 0
New international partners for FutureLearn http://thepienews.com/news/new-international-partners-for-futurelearn/ http://thepienews.com/news/new-international-partners-for-futurelearn/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 12:56:01 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55863 MOOC platform, FutureLearn, has announced it is partnering with five new universities around the world, further expanding the global reach of its online courses that will be available from October.

The post New international partners for FutureLearn appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
Online MOOC platform FutureLearn has announced it is partnering with five more universities worldwide to provide new free online courses to its users.

The Complutense University of Madrid, Durham University and the University of Manchester in the UK, Keio University in Japan and the University of New South Wales, Australia, have all joined FutureLearn’s portfolio.

“Social learning has made great strides through FutureLearn”

FutureLearn will work with the institutions to create the online courses, which will become available on the social learning platform from October this year.

According to a FutureLearn spokesperson, each institution has committed to create at least two MOOCs.

The latest mainland European partner, the Complutense University of Madrid, will launch its first course next year, entitled “Viral Diseases in Animals”.

Luis Hernández Yáñez, vice president for information technology at Complutense University of Madrid, has said MOOC development is one of the institution’s “strategic lines”.

“We want our courses to be available on the world’s leading e-learning platforms, and FutureLearn is one of them,” he said.

“We are sure our partnership with FutureLearn will help us be where we want to be.”

Keio University, the platform’s first Japanese partner, will create a course looking at Japan’s history of book production, available to users from next year.

Chief executive of FutureLearn, Simon Nelson, said adding these five institutions reflects the international reach of the platform.

“Social learning has made great strides through FutureLearn and I know our global community of learners will relish the opportunity to engage with leading educators from these five institutions as they pursue their goals for professional development and further study,” he said.

According to the FutureLearn spokesperson, 60% of the platform’s learners come from outside the UK.

“It follows that we would reflect that diversity in our course-creating partners,” they told The PIE News.

FutureLearn has seen almost two million registrations since it launched in September 2013.

With the addition of these five institutions, it now has 50 university partners in 14 different countries.

The platform also has a further 22 institutions as partners, including specialist organisations, like the British Council, the British Museum and the European Space Agency.

It has also partnered with centres of excellence, both in Australia and Denmark.

The post New international partners for FutureLearn appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/new-international-partners-for-futurelearn/feed/ 0
Stephanie Nails Kane, SABS, Senegal http://thepienews.com/pie-chat/stephanie-nails-kane-sabs-senegal/ http://thepienews.com/pie-chat/stephanie-nails-kane-sabs-senegal/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 12:37:28 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55832 Our school became very popular and now we have probably over 20 bilingual schools in the city, so it actually set a trend.

The post Stephanie Nails Kane, SABS, Senegal appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
The Senegalese-American Bilingual School was the first primary school in Senegal to teach English as a second language. Director, Stephanie Nails Kane, talks to The PIE about her vision to educate the leaders of Senegal and why she prefers small learning communities.

The PIE: How did you start your school?

SK: I was born in New York and went to Germany at the age of 12. I went to the US for university studies but Germany became home and upon graduating from university, I went back there and taught English as a second language as well as basic skills in high school courses. I studied international studies and Africa was my concentration. Adapting to Senegal and understanding the realities was not that difficult.

I moved to Senegal and started teaching English as a second language and began to do research on the process of learning a second language . About five years into teaching at the university and at the American Cultural Centre, I got the idea to start an English language programme at the neighbourhood school my children were attending. And that grew into a summer camp, and that summer camp grew into a pre-school.

“We have students representing over 35 different nationalities”

We opened our doors in 1993 with nine three-and-four-year-olds. The school now has 1,000 students. We offer both the Senegalese national baccalaureate, as well as the American high school diploma programme. It’s a bilingual programme, so students are learning either English or French, but they come out fluent in both languages.

It is located in Dakar, the capital. Senegal has about 14 million people, and about two million live in Dakar. It’s right on the coast.

The PIE: Where do your students come from?

SK: We have students representing over 35 different nationalities – 35% of them are American passport holders, many of them grew up in the US, and they have come back to Senegal to do middle school and high school. Some of them are of parents who just went to the United States, had their children there and want them to be in an American programme but in Senegal. Around 40-50% have not had an international experience but want to be bilingual before finishing secondary school.

The PIE: Where do your students go when they graduate?

SK: The majority of them actually go abroad to study. Most of them to the United States, but a large group of them go to Canada, and to the Middle East. We have four students who will be going to the Rochester Institute of Technology, we have students at the American University of Sharjah and during the past four years, we have had over 20 of our students studying in China.

Our graduating class is not that big; we have about 75-100 students a year. Coming out of our Senegalese programme with the baccalaureate, it gives them access to European universities, so France is also a destination; we also have students going to Germany.

“Our school became very popular and now we have probably over 20 bilingual schools in the city, so it actually set a trend”

The PIE: Why did you decide to set up your school?

SK: A traditional Senegalese school really puts more emphasis on reading, writing and arithmetic. I wanted to bring an arts programme to the local school. I proposed it to the school administration, it was basically a volunteer programme. It was so popular, they asked me to do a curriculum, and it was the first primary school to teach English as a second language in Senegal. It was an experiment actually to see how early pre-school aged children would acquire English.

The local language is Wolof and many of the children come from homes that are not Wolof-speaking but another African language, so they have their maternal language and then they have Wolof which is the lingua franca in the city, and then they may even have French. They hear French on television or their parents speaking French, and then English was in fact a third or fourth language for many of them.

Our school became very popular and now we have probably over 20 bilingual schools in the city, so it actually set a trend.

The PIE: What is the student life like in Senegal?

SK: Our school definitely offers an alternative to the typical student life. In Senegal, on the primary and the high school level, there’s a lot of rote-learning going on because students are taught to pass an exam. If you can imagine the type of pressure when you think of only five out of 100 students finish with the end of school completion. In sixth grade, there’s a national exam, and this gives them a place in public high school, which only 30% pass, and then only 30% of them will actually pass the exam in to 10th grade. And then even less will actually come out with their baccalaureate. So it’s almost a process of elimination.

There’s a lot of stress, there’s no emphasis on the arts, and students always have to pass that hurdle of the next exam. However, my school offers an alternative to that because students prepare the American high school diploma, which is kind of different where students pass exams per subject, every semester and kind of acquire credits, but it also allows them to explore different types of learning and clubs.

We have a lot of co-curricular activities we’re really strong on, environmental projects, and service learning.

The PIE: Are there a lot of international students in Senegal?

“Senegal has a really vibrant art community, it’s become a haven for a lot of people”

SK: There are a lot because Senegal is a very nice country to live in – even climate wise for Africa. It’s very stable, and it’s a hub for international organisations so you have a large cosmopolitan population. It’s got a vibrant art community; it’s become a haven for a lot of people.

There are lots of private schools and many private universities, and because of the stability on the higher education level, students come from all over West Africa and surprisingly large numbers from Djibouti and even Madagascar, because they’re French speaking countries too.

The PIE: What about Senegalese students going abroad?

SK: For economic reasons many of them have to stay in the country, but there is a large middle class that can afford to send their children outside, and they usually don’t have a big problem getting visas. Canada and the US are big destinations, and of course France. France is becoming a bit more difficult, but there are quite a few that go out.

The PIE: What motivates you to do what you do?

SK: Years and years ago, when it was even just a pre-school, our vision was to shape the world leaders of tomorrow. And it’s become our mission actually – I’m very passionate about it. I never get tired, I actually love what I’m doing and because I have seen how our students have blossomed into real leaders we get very positive feedback from their university experience.

“Students can’t wait to come back to Senegal to share with their former classmates. That brings me a lot of joy because they will be in the leadership of the country”

They can’t wait to come back to Senegal to share with their former classmates. That brings me a lot of joy because they will be in the leadership of the country, I know. They’re doing great things and they will create the jobs that don’t exist, I’m fully confident.

The PIE: What are some of your alumni doing?

SK: One of the things I’m most proud of is the number of students who go on to major in environmental science, environmental engineering, and sustainable development. And they go onto postgraduate work. Many of them are still in their studies, but they are in internships and doing really great things around the world. As we speak, I know of some doing internships in South Africa, Florida, and Canada.

The PIE: Are you planning on expanding your school further?

SK: I like the numbers we have now. In fact our school is unique in that it is 1,000 students, but they are on seven different sites in the same neighbourhood. What that means is that no given site has any more than 150 students. So it’s a real small ratio between the administration and the students, so the administration gets to really know the students and there’s a great trust between them. We eventually will come together but the idea is that we build in small communities on the campus because we know that works.

The PIE: How do you see the educational landscape in Senegal changing in the near future?

“Back in Senegal, there’s everything to do because so little has been done and the playing field is changing with technology”

SK: In the next few years, first of all Senegal will probably continue to have a large influx of students coming there to study. I also predict that many of the students who did study abroad will be coming home simply because of all the opportunities to create. In the West, things are expensive and pretty much markets are saturated. It’s probably less familiar territory for them in terms of starting or creating businesses.

Back in Senegal, there’s everything to do because so little has been done and the playing field is changing with technology. So it’s interesting to see how it will play itself out but many students feel like the opportunities are back home in Senegal and they can still be connected with the rest of the world. And there’s a lot more mobility there so it’s not like they come back to Senegal and they’re stuck. I think even in terms of the West and Asia, people can see that Africa as a whole is going to be a growing market.

The post Stephanie Nails Kane, SABS, Senegal appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/pie-chat/stephanie-nails-kane-sabs-senegal/feed/ 0
Global HE unites to solve urban challenges http://thepienews.com/news/global-he-unites-to-solve-urban-challenges/ http://thepienews.com/news/global-he-unites-to-solve-urban-challenges/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 11:45:58 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55848 The first WC2 network symposium was held in London this week, showcasing how universities are working in collaboration with cities worldwide.

The post Global HE unites to solve urban challenges appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
Universities from around the world have come together this week to highlight the need to work collaboratively to help solve challenges in their urban environments.

The WC2 network’s inaugural symposium, which took place in London, saw the eleven member universities meet to share and consider the challenges faced by urban areas.

“Universities need to say that they’re open for that kind of business”

More people than ever are living in and around an urban metropolis. In 1990, 37% of people worldwide lived in a city, and the figure has now risen to over half the world’s population.

The seminars were based on five areas of focus: transport, health, business and entrepreneurship, global cultures and sustainability.

Stanton Newman, chair of the WC2 network, underlined how important it is for universities around the world to not only collaborate with each other, but to work with other bodies in their cities.

“People don’t know the city government expectation of universities, and universities don’t really know what their mission is and how they can interact, so there’s a whole level of engagement between the two,” he told The PIE News.

“That’s why in particular it’s all around what government thinks, what the examples of developments have been and indeed what universities think and where universities are.”

The network was created in 2010 with the aim to bring the universities together for research.

Newman said that UK universities need to learn from their international partners when it comes to this collaboration.

“Universities need to say that they’re open for that kind of business and I’m not sure they are saying that,” he said.

“But the city government needs to see the university not just as an agent of employment, which is often the mantra you hear today coming across.”

“Are you exploiting what the university has in the best ways you can for the city?” he added.

Newman said that in the future, the network will hope to facilitate joint degrees for students to take across different institutions.

The post Global HE unites to solve urban challenges appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/global-he-unites-to-solve-urban-challenges/feed/ 0
Record number of Nepalis plan to study abroad http://thepienews.com/news/record-number-of-nepalis-plan-to-study-abroad/ http://thepienews.com/news/record-number-of-nepalis-plan-to-study-abroad/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 10:55:13 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55842 A record number of Nepalese students are planning to study abroad this year, as figures from the Ministry of Education show a threefold increase in the number of students that have applied for university studies overseas over the last four years.

The post Record number of Nepalis plan to study abroad appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
A record number of Nepalese students are planning to study abroad this year, as figures from the Ministry of Education show a threefold increase in the number of students that have applied for university studies overseas over the last four years.

As many as 29,380 students have been issued a No Objection Certificate, which they must obtain in order to study at an overseas university, in the year to June 2015 – up 4.5% on the previous year.

“If it weren’t for financial or other constraints these numbers would increase even more”

The increase is driven by the “perception of better quality education with more subject choices when studying abroad, an expectation that studying abroad will boost career prospects (bet it at home or abroad) and the whole cultural experience of studying abroad”, Abhinav Shakya, project manager for the British Council’s Services for International Education Marketing division in Nepal, told The PIE News.

An estimated 80% of the students who receive a NOC go on to travel to their chosen destination, according to the ministry.

This marks the fourth consecutive year that NOC issuances have risen. The continued increase means that numbers of students intending to travel overseas for study has nearly tripled since 2011/12, when 11,912 NOCs were issued.

“The desire to study abroad has increased steadily over a much longer period and if it weren’t for financial or other constraints these numbers would increase even more,” Shakya said.

Japan is the most popular destination among this year’s students, with 9,363 NOCs issued, overtaking Australia, which this year had 8,692, down from 11,184 in 2014.

Meanwhile, the number of NOCs for travel to the US, the third most popular destination, doubled to 3,642.

A further 1,018 students applied to study in India, while 979 applied for Malaysia.

The previous peak in numbers was in 2010/11, when almost 27,000 NOCs were issued, but policy changes in the UK and Australia led to a dramatic drop the following year, according to Shakya.

“It is also evident that a majority of prospective students are looking for demonstrable evidence of return on investment”

Australia numbers have since increased as visa policy has opened up, but UK numbers remain low, with just 350 NOCs issued to students intending to study there in 2015.

“That there is clearly a desire to go abroad and people are willing to spend seems obvious, however it is also evident that a majority of prospective students are looking for demonstrable evidence of return on investment in the shorter term as well,” Shakya wrote in a British Council analysis of the data.

“In the absence of a guaranteed post-study work visa, UK institutions will need to look at marketing employability by tracking employment in home country or even internationally,” he advised.

Since the Nepali government does not provide hard data showing how many students travel abroad every year, NOC issuances are the most reliable indicator for study abroad trends.

Students who apply are “almost always” issued the certificate, provided they have the right documents including an acceptance letter from the overseas institution, according to Shakya.

The post Record number of Nepalis plan to study abroad appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/record-number-of-nepalis-plan-to-study-abroad/feed/ 0
UK universities not unscathed in immigration crackdown http://thepienews.com/news/uk-universities-not-unscathed-in-immigration-crackdown/ http://thepienews.com/news/uk-universities-not-unscathed-in-immigration-crackdown/#comments Thu, 13 Aug 2015 17:47:55 +0000 http://thepienews.com/?p=55824 International students at UK universities will only be able to extend their studies at the same academic level if they can prove it relates to their previous field of study. They will also need to prove they have more savings than before.

The post UK universities not unscathed in immigration crackdown appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
With the recent news that further education colleges will be impacted by dramatic immigration changes, foreign nationals at UK universities will also be facing new hurdles this autumn.

Announced last month, the UK government has made a number of changes to the immigration rules, including scrapping all part-time work rights for non-EU students studying at publicly funded colleges.

“The speed and lack of warning I think has been quite unfair”

Home Secretary, Theresa May, has also implemented tighter rules for international students at universities starting with those who wish to extend their studies at the same academic level.

If the desired course does not move up a notch on the National Qualifications Framework, then students will be required to prove how it is related to their previous field of study.

Furthermore, universities will be required to confirm that this new course supports the student’s career aspirations.

Immigration Minister, James Brokenshire, said that these new measures have been implemented in order to “reduce net migration and to tackle immigration abuse”, while ensuring the UK maintains “an excellent offer for students who wish to study at our world-class universities”.

Nichola Carter, of Carter Thomas Solicitors, said that the speed at which these changes are being introduced will almost certainly have an impact on the sector.

“The changes related to academic progression, [are] to some extent fairly complicated and require universities in particular to redesign potentially some of their processes,” she told The PIE News.

“The speed and lack of warning I think has been quite unfair.”

The government has also announced that beginning in November this year, students applying for Tier 4 status – the visa used for international students – will have to provide evidence of a higher amount of financial savings to cover their living costs than before.

Students need to prove they can support themselves financially for up to nine months, or for the duration of their study.

Currently, those studying outside London need to have a minimum of £820 per month. This will increase to £1,015 from November 12.

However, for students looking to go to inner London, the minimum amount required is currently £1,020 a month, which will rise to £1,265.

“Any increase in the salary threshold is going to make it even more difficult for students to move up into Tier 2″

Furthermore, the boundaries defining what area is considered London are being expanded.

This will include the University of London or institutions wholly or partly within the City of London and parts of Surrey, Essex and Hertfordshire.

The statement of changes in immigration rules explains that the amount required to cover living costs is set at the same level as English students with the maximum loan and grant.

It adds that the amount is being amended to “reflect the new rates for students starting courses from September 2015”.

In addition, the migration advisory committee has been asked to consider the impact of increasing the salary threshold for those applying for Tier 2 status – skilled graduate visa.

Currently, the minimum salary for Tier 2 (general) is £20,800.

“Any increase in the salary threshold is going to make it even more difficult for students to move up into Tier 2,” said Carter.

As more changes have been rolled out for international students, Carter believes that there may be more enforcement action by UKVI.

“In the case of many sponsors, they won’t be aware that they’re doing things that UKVI may in the future regard as a breach,” she said.

The post UK universities not unscathed in immigration crackdown appeared first on The PIE News.

]]>
http://thepienews.com/news/uk-universities-not-unscathed-in-immigration-crackdown/feed/ 1